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At Long Last:

Tim Buckley: Live at the Folklore Center, NYC - March 6, 1967

By Andy Schwartz - June 2, 2009

On a visit to my former Sony Music office circa 1999 from his adopted city of Stockholm, the one and only Izzy Young entrusted me with a reel of analog tape containing his one and only recording of Tim Buckley’s first New York concert.


© Michael Ochs/Getty Images
Appearing March 6, 1967 at Izzy’s Folklore Center in Greenwich Village. Tim performed a lengthy set for an estimated 35 listeners accompanied only by his own twelve-string acoustic guitar.

For the next eight or nine years, I made sporadic unsuccessful efforts to get this tape released by a legitimate record company. Finally, in 2008, my good friend Josh Rosenthal of Tompkins Square stepped up to the plate with a reasonable financial offer; the determination to navigate a minefield of clearances and permissions, and — most importantly — an innate understanding of the power, beauty, and significance of this remarkable performance.

In contrast to all previous posthumous releases (Live in London from ‘68, Honeyman from ‘73, etc.) Folklore Center is the only solo live Tim Buckley recording that has emerged to date. “He plays sixteen songs,” Josh Rosenthal marvels, “and never hits a wrong note.”

Josh and the staff of The Magic Shop have worked small wonders of engineering to improve the sound of Izzy’s one-microphone recording, and the result is not only a must-buy for any fan of Tim Buckley but perhaps the most important non-box set archival release of 2009.

This RollingStone.com article is the first shot in what will surely be a fusillade of media acclaim (deserved, for once) for Tim Buckley - Live at the Folklore Center, NYC - March 6, 1967.

© Schwartz/New York Rocker


Andy began writing about pop music circa 1972 as an undergraduate at the University of Minnesota and later wrote a weekly column (”Blues, Rags, and Hollers”) for the alternative weekly Metropolis. He also worked behind the counter of the legendary Minneapolis record shop Oar Folkjokeopus.

Soon after returning to New York in 1977, Andy became publisher and editor of New York Rocker, the punk/new wave magazine founded by the late Alan Betrock (1950-2000). Under Andy’s direction, NYR published 44 issues (through December 1982) and became the most widely-read and influential American publication of its kind.

In December 2007, Greenwood Press published the two-volume reference work Icons Of Rock co-written with Scott Schinder and featuring Andy’s essays on James Brown, Led Zeppelin, and Ray Charles.


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